Home » Wagon of Fools: and Other Parables by Samuel Benjamin Gray
Wagon of Fools: and Other Parables Samuel Benjamin Gray

Wagon of Fools: and Other Parables

Samuel Benjamin Gray

Published September 27th 2009
ISBN :
Kindle Edition
323 pages
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 About the Book 

This is a unique work written for thoughtful Christian readers hungry for good literature—for those who, tired of fiction littered with thin or anemic characters, predictable plots, and cliché endings, walk into bookstores searching for something byMoreThis is a unique work written for thoughtful Christian readers hungry for good literature—for those who, tired of fiction littered with thin or anemic characters, predictable plots, and cliché endings, walk into bookstores searching for something by George MacDonald or C.S. Lewis. Like any good parable, each challenges some aspect of current trends in the religious culture of the day while asserting truth.Story Before a Patrol is a short, fast-paced narrative related by a Jewish partisan who must come to grips with a dilemma—his people are being murdered en masse, yet he was taught that God is sovereign over all things. What does God want? What is God doing? And why the Jews?Macushla is a parable about suffering. It seems that Gray’s prose here is suffused with shades of Patrick O’Brian (it is told from an Irish narrator’s perspective, with the same sweet appreciation for life and the glory of words). The story is a brief, sad, sweeping, epochal view of one woman’s life as she endures what can only be described as the deepest wound, the hardest sacrifice, and the sweetest joy.Up on Millstone Ridge is a gray and solemn story, tinged with ashes, which poses the stark but rapidly emerging question to Christians: “What will you do when faced with demands from a totalitarian state—demands which directly contradict or prohibit the exercise of your faith—and you must make a choice between obeying God or obeying man?”When Revelation Kissed Reason is written in the genre of a fable- a famous doctor who treats autistic children in a clinic in the Adirondacks encounters a strange gardener with a unique perception of who God is and what He requires. In his contentions with this man, the doctor comes to learn by experience why God sent His Son, and why each of us must individually come to that Son to be truly healed. Gray takes this title, we suspect, from a line of text in one of Mark Helprin’s stories in which Helprin laments the vast and unbridgeable gulf between Revelation and Reason. The story is a heart’s cry from God to the Jew, in respect and love, calling them to recognize He Who is Truth and Beauty and Righteousness and Peace, and to demonstrate that Jesus is the only bridge between Revelation and Reason.Note to Horatio is the story of a despairing man who flees to the wilderness to recover from the pain caused by disobedience, and in his solitude encounters someone whose life depicts a different perspective on religion. For those who despair of today’s institutional church—its adherence to cultural tradition which actively negates the supremacy of Jesus in a person’s life- its growing decline into the poisonous swamp of modern-day culture- and its pointless, at times blasphemous dalliance with New Age teaching—this story will particularly resonate.Return to Koidanyev is a short, ironic fable which, in a politically-incorrect way challenges much of today’s current Jewish community and their typical political inclinations. Again, referencing Helprin’s short story, Jacob Bayer and the Telephone (highly recommend), in which a Rabbi during the early part of the 20th century visits a fictional Russian village called Koidanyev, Gray takes Jewish readers to task for their habitual support of policies and politics which have throughout history embodied the very spirit of death to the Jewish people. And too in this biting parable Gray highlights the fact that all of us—Jews and non-Jews—are our own worst enemy as we seek anything other than simply obedient service to the true Messiah.Wagon of Fools, the title story of this collection, is perhaps the strangest parable of them all.