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On the Functions of the Brain and of Each of Its Parts Volume 6 Franz Joseph Gall

On the Functions of the Brain and of Each of Its Parts Volume 6

Franz Joseph Gall

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230289205
Paperback
96 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1835 edition. Excerpt: ... turning in his bed fromMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1835 edition. Excerpt: ... turning in his bed from one side to the other, and constantly moving his. legs and arms. (See also vol. m.) In all these cases, the cerebellum has been injured- irregularity of motions ensued, and no paralysis. Experiments on the Cerebellum of Reptiles and Fishes. Rolando separated the cerebellum from the medulla oblongata in a tortoise- he became paralyzed, and lived in this condition for ten or twelve days without making the least motion. Another tortoise lived two months, constantly sensible to the slightest touches, but so far immovable, that he could not stir from the place where he was troubled: the same thing occurred to a lizard and two serpents. Two fishes also lost the faculty of moving. Rolando observed, that injuries made in the cerebellum, healed promptly, and then the pullets, tortoises, recovered their former faculty of motion. The first tortoise, in which he only tore and divided the cerebellum, remained paralytic for many hours- but soon after it acquired a surprising faculty of motion and so great was this, that it stepped with a rapidity four times as great, as it was before accustomed to do. Rolando had the curiosity to examine the cerebellum, which was only covered with coagulated blood- it appeared to him cicatrized and considerably increased in size. Gould it be possible, adds he, that the cerebellum, having acquired by means of this cicatrix a greater development, can thus contribute to this unusual agility? Finally, Rolando gives us the promised explanation of the functions of the brain and cerebellum, and the morbid alterations the most difficult to understand, and all this by the assistance of the new structure of the brain, such as he has described it: In considering the hemispheres of the brain, as a mass...